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NTEU launches ‘They Work For U.S.’ campaign

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The National Treasury Employees Union is sick and tired of federal employees being knocked, and today announced a major nationwide public relations campaign that seeks to get them the respect they deserve. Their “Federal Employees … They Work For U.S.” campaign has distributed public service announcements to 200 television stations and 600 radio stations nationwide that highlight what feds contribute to society.

It comes at a time when the government is scrambling to find ways to slash the deficit, and cuts to federal employees’ pay and benefits have popped up on every major debt reduction plan. This has federal employee advocates nervous, and eager to change the narrative that has taken hold — primarily among conservatives — that  federal employees are overpaid, underworked drains on society. But Office of Personnel Management Director John Berry has often said that while some people love to rail against “pasty-faced,” anonymous bureaucrats, their opinions change when you start talking about specific federal employees.

(Anyone who’s heard Berry’s usual stump speech has heard his incredibly animated impression of a grouchy, anti-fed citizen turning on a dime and enthusing about the National Park Service ranger who guided his family around Gettysburg, the federal firefighter who put out a forest fire and saved his home, and the Secret Service agent who exudes professionalism.)

This campaign aims to accomplish just that personalization. In a briefing with reporters announcing the campaign, NTEU President Colleen Kelley said:

Federal employees do very important work every day. They guard our borders, and they protect our air and our water supply, they provide school lunches to children around the country. They do important things that the public doesn’t really pay attention to because it happens, and so they expect it will happen.

Kelley said the PSAs could run anywhere from six months to a year, and NTEU plans to take the fight to social media as well, primarily through a Facebook page. Here are the two TV spots some stations are already running:

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Comments

  1. IRS agent Says:
    July 21st, 2011 at 9:14 pm

    Instead of ads, it would be nice if the union stood up for career tenured employees who are being misclassified as probationary and denied all of their due process rights. Even an employee who had nothing but excellent evaluations for his/her entire career – whose files have been completely falsified – can be railroaded out without due process in order to get the hiring manager’s daughter and the territory manager’s brother in law jobs. The union will not even allow a career tenured employee to talk to a union lawyer – they will not even call you back. While there are some good stewards, the leadership is useless. In fact the union vp in my area helped management break the union contract (I had seniority) to force me out of my POD to make room for his friend (the hiring manager’s) daughter. She was a former library worker, and she replaced CPA/MBA’s with 20 yrs experience (who were forced out to make room for her). Due to the union’s failure to take my case to arbitration, my life was destroyed. I was 45 with a great job (which I needed, with 2 kids), and IRS took everything – my life, my health, they even took my career tenure without my knowledge – they got MSPB to trick me into signing it away, along with my life. I was an employee with full due process rights – yet was allowed no due process. Although some chapters of the union seem good, this was not the case in my area, and at the national level. People in my area call lawyers rather than trust the union.

  2. mzoda24 Says:
    July 22nd, 2011 at 8:03 am

    The only way you can be tricked into anything is if you allow it. At 45 you should have enough experience to be able to think for yourself. Why did you sign something without reading it? I’ve dealt with MSPB and they normally lean to the side of the complaintant and not the agency. What files were falsified? Agencies? Don’t you save your own original paperwork? Unfortunately, no matter the situation, some of the blame rests with you. No one watches out for you but you. Way of the world.

  3. IRS agent Says:
    July 22nd, 2011 at 8:28 am

    I had never been in a courtroom in my life – I had excellent evaluations for my entire career, so I had no experience with nepotism, and didn’t know till after settlement what the hiring manager had gained (a job for his unqualified daughter). I’m not a lawyer, and everyone I’ve spoken to would have thought the same thing – that the judge was in charge of the hearing – when he told me my only option was settling (for less than nothing – they did not even cover the legal fees) since the MSPB would not hear my case due to my being misclassified by OPM/IRS as probationary). I later found out they were required to hear it since I was an employee with full due process rights when terminated, like my coworker, without cause (1/3 of all Treasury hires are gone within 2 years, and often 50% of trainees at IRS at certain POD’s are targeted). In our case, the 3 older of the 5 were targeted, all excellent employees, in order to hire their cronies. The personnel files on me contain talk of cases that weren’t mine, and contain backdated memos to the wrong agent – falsified completely, and I never got to present these falsifications to anyone. This is what the “manager” is known for – this is why he was removed from his position back when management was good at IRS – due to what the union called a “mutiny” – “mass grievances, forcing him from his position.” Current management just moved him back – to a new location, with new victims.

  4. IRS agent Says:
    July 22nd, 2011 at 8:35 am

    I had never been in a courtroom in my life – I had excellent evaluations for my entire career – 18 1/2 years, so I had no experience with nepotism, and didn’t know till after settlement what the hiring manager had gained (a job for his unqualified daughter). I’m not a lawyer, and everyone I’ve spoken to would have thought the same thing – that the judge was in charge of the hearing – when he told me my only option was settling (for less than nothing – they did not even cover the legal fees) since the MSPB would not hear my case due to my being misclassified by OPM/IRS as probationary). When you are misclassified as probationary, the IRS can even dictate the wording of the settlement: after many expensive attempts to change the wording, my requests were denied – $ 25 for each e-mail – $ 30,000 on lawyers, with no job, when I was an employee with full due process rights. I had paid union dues for close to 20 years – my grievance should not have been blocked. I later found out they were required to hear it since I was an employee with full due process rights when terminated, like my coworker, without cause (1/3 of all Treasury hires are gone within 2 years, and often 50% of trainees at IRS at certain POD’s are targeted). In our case, the 3 older of the 5 were targeted, all excellent employees, in order to hire their cronies. The personnel files on me contain talk of cases that weren’t mine, and contain backdated memos to the wrong agent – falsified completely, and I never got to present these falsifications to anyone. This is what the “manager” is known for – this is why he was removed from his position back when management was good at IRS – due to what the union called a “mutiny” – “mass grievances, forcing him from his position.” Current management just moved him back – to a new location, with new victims.

  5. Mike Says:
    July 22nd, 2011 at 10:03 pm

    I am an executive at a Big 4 accounting firm, and I am disgusted by the greed and arrogance of lazy government workers and their unions. We need to start imposing the pain of the private sector on federal employees to make America more business-friendly. Government workers’ bloated salaries increase the cost of labor for my business, because we have to compete with the government–which offers higher wages–for skilled CPAs, financial analysts and attorneys. By cutting federal jobs and compensation, we will have less competition in the labor market and in turn will be able to deliver more profit to shareholders, instead of squandering resources on payroll. In addition, private sector businesses pay the overly generous salaries and benefits of government workers through high taxes. We need to eliminate these so-called “middle class” government jobs so that we can have appropriately lower wages in this country for the less productive, while those who are more deserving and productive can accumulate more wealth by enjoying lower labor costs and lower corporate taxes. I propose that we eliminate nearly all government jobs, and that the remaining government jobs (if any) be outsourced to private companies with access to cheaper labor markets in India and China.

  6. Lori Says:
    July 25th, 2011 at 4:16 pm

    So Mike, you want to contract out the government to foreign markets? I guess Ignorance is very blissful for you because you have no idea what you are talking about. The fiscal irresponsibility of Congress has been going on for decades but the American public didn’t care until it affected enough of us personnally. Now, somehow the federal employees are lower than scum. Nobody cared about us when you were making money hand over fist in the 80′s, 90′s and the new millinium but now that people sat there and said nothing when they knew the financial markets were going to bust one day and they have, federal employees are all of a sudden the bad guys. Quit believing everything you read and hear on TV and actually do some REAL RESEARCH about what it is really like to be a federal employee and the work we do.

  7. Jim Says:
    July 25th, 2011 at 4:28 pm

    I wonder what Mike would say if we outsourced the US Military to China, India or Mexico. Does he classify military members as “greedy, arrogant and lazy government workers”? Are they not employed by Uncle Sam? It sounds as if Mikey is suffering from private sector greed… which coincidentally is the same problem that got us into these current financial difficulties.

  8. IRS agent Says:
    September 12th, 2011 at 10:23 am

    Mike is anti-American.

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