Ask The Experts: Retirement

By Reg Jones

Supplement calculation

Bookmark and Share

Q. As a retired federal law enforcement officer who earned a law enforcement retirement under FERS, I am approaching my 56th birthday. Since the SRS supplement will be discontinued or reduced at age 56 (MRA), I am curious as to how this amount is calculated? I am aware it will be reduced for anything I earn over $15,480 annually, not counting my pension. Will OPM send me an inquiry, or is this something I am supposed to submit? Do they base it on my earnings when I turn 56, or the previous year’s earnings? I would like to keep the full amount, so I am considering when to leave my current employment. Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: ,

Deferred retirement

Bookmark and Share

Q. I am 50 and I have been in government for 27 years. I am going to apply for a deferred retirement at age 60 or 62.  I thought I read somewhere that the “high-3″ was consecutive. If I was a GS-13 and due to BRAC had to come back into the government at a much lower grade, could I still use my high-3 including grades 11-13 or am I required to use the last grade I held?

A. Yes. Your high-3 is the highest three consecutive years of average basic pay (78 pay periods), regardless of when they occur in your career.

Tags: ,

TSP and taxes

Bookmark and Share

Q. I intend to make a lump-sum payment this year to pay off the balance owed to recapture my military service for inclusion of this time toward my FERS retirement. I am paying it with after-tax dollars I have saved. Can this amount be claimed as a tax credit or claimed as a tax deduction? Which document says what can be claimed or that neither can be claimed?

A. No. It can neither be claimed as a tax credit nor a tax deduction.

Tags: ,

Social Security earnings

Bookmark and Share

Q. I am 62 and would like to retire and receive my social security. What is the most I can earn per week without my benefit being cut?  Read the rest of this entry »

VSIP Amount Calculation

Bookmark and Share

Q. I received $19,100.00 severance pay in a RIF in 1996. In 2000 I was re-employed by the Federal Government. I am now considering a VSIP. What amount can I expect? I am 72 years old with 20 years of service. Read the rest of this entry »

Lump sum for unused annual leave

Bookmark and Share

Q. How soon would I receive my lump sum payment for unused annual leave when I retire?

A. Only your agency payroll office can answer that question.

Military Buyback and Pay Increases

Bookmark and Share

Q. I will be separating from the military in September 2014 with 11 years, six months service. I am looking to get a federal GS job where I can buy back my military time. I know this goes toward the pension plan, but does it also count anything toward GS within-grade pay increase? Read the rest of this entry »

Within grade pay increase

Bookmark and Share

Q. I will separate from the military in September with 11 years, 6 months of service. I am looking to get a federal GS job where I can buy back my military time. I know this goes toward the pension plan, but does it also count anything toward GS within-grade pay increase?

A. As a non-retired former member of the military, your active-duty service will be used to establish your service computation date and, thus, your annual leave accrual category. It doesn’t count toward the step at which you are hired. However, if you have special skills that would make you highly desirable, you can try negotiating for a higher entry step with the agency that is considering hiring you.

Tags:

Retirement age

Bookmark and Share

Q. If you worked full time for the federal government for six years and part time for four years, and retired at age 62, can you obtain federal retirement then?

A. Yes. In fact, you would only have to have five years of service to be entitled to a retirement annuity at age 62.

 

Tags:

Buy back

Bookmark and Share

Q. I have 20 years at the VA and two years of military service of which I paid back to get credit. I worked in the Postal Service from 1970 to 1977 and took out my retirement.  Can I repay, with interest, that money to receive credit for those seven years?

A. Yes, you can.

Tags: ,

‘Retire, FERS’ refund

Bookmark and Share

Q. My wife worked for the federal government from 2011 to 2012 and resigned in August 2012 due to medical reasons. During that two years of service, $222.07 was deducted from her pay for “Retire, FERS” and there were matching funds of $3281.31, so the total is $3503.30 for the “Retire, FERS.” Can my wife request that money be refunded?

A. If she doesn’t plan to return to federal service, she would only be entitled to a refund of her own retirement contributions. Doing so would cancel her entitlement to any future retirement benefit. However, if she got a refund and later returned to federal service, she could redeposit that money, plus accrued interest, to get credit for that period of service.

 

Retirement annuity after job switch

Bookmark and Share

Q. I have recently retired from an air traffic controller job, collecting a retirement annuity from the government. I am 55 years old and was wondering if I can now get a job with another government agency (Homeland Security) and still retain my retirement annuity. Is there anything written about this, and where would I find it?

A. Whether you can get a job with another agency is up to them. As a rule, your new salary would be offset by the amount of your annuity. However, there are limited authorities that allow an annuitant to receive both his annuity and his full salary. Before you accept a job, you’ll have to be sure which rule applies. If you find a position that allows you to receive both, when you retire again, your annuity won’t be recomputed to include that new period of service.

Unpaid non-deposit

Bookmark and Share

Q. A friend is in her 48th year of federal service and has not, to date, paid the non-deposit for her first three years of employment. Once she passed 41 yrs 11 months of federal employment, a deduction for the non-deposit began to be deducted from her check. Is this the usual protocol in this situation? Will she be able to repay her non-deposit before she retires, now that this has happened? Read the rest of this entry »

Lump sum rate for unused annual leave

Bookmark and Share

Q. I have a question about determination of the amount I will be paid for unused annual leave. I was in a temporary promotion to DB-04 (GS-14 equivalent) NTE July 24, 2014. If I retire July 31, 2014, will I be paid for annual leave at the salary rate of the GS-14? Read the rest of this entry »

Service separation bonus and annuity computation

Bookmark and Share

Q. I have 14 years and 8 months of active Army service. In 1993, when Regan was initiating draw down of troops and instituted SSB (Service Separation Bonus),
I received a Service Separation Bonus in 1993′s drawdown of $40,000 before taxes and separated from the Army in Sept. 1993. In June 1995, I entered the federal service as a full time Civilian Government Employee working for the Army Material Command where I work today. At the end of this month, I will have 18 years and 9 months as a federal government worker. I am currently 56 years old.

Would it be more beneficial to add my active military service time to my federal government service time in order to receive a higher pension upon retirement? And if so, will I have to “pay back” the SSB I received in 1993? In general, my annuity would be based on the following formula: .01 x (your high-3) x (your years and full months of service). If I use this formula, then I would require a deposit, correct? Read the rest of this entry »

Lump sum annual leave payout

Bookmark and Share

Q. I retired from the USDA Forest Service at the end of PP-26 (1-11-2014). I had 442 hours of annual leave and 15 credit hours at the time of my retirement.  All of this lump sum time was paid out at the 2013 pay rate.  From everything I had read, I thought these hours should have been paid out at the 2014 (1 percent pay raise) rate. Should these hours been paid at the ’13 or ’14 pay rate?

Read the rest of this entry »

Leaving federal service

Bookmark and Share

Q. I am a federal employee (FERS employee from January 1988 to the present) who will likely be leaving federal employment for a private sector position in a different city. What happens to the following:
1. Can I either leave my money in the TSP account or roll it over; in any case, I am not touching the balance until I retire.
2. Am I correct that my retirement annuity freezes until I actually retire and that it would be based on the following calculation — years of service (.26) x the average of the high-3 annual salary?
3. Do I get a lump sum payout for annual leave?
4. Can I get my sick leave back if I return to federal service?
5. I know health care terminates after 30 days. But am I eligible to get any Federal health care after I retire from the private sector?

Read the rest of this entry »

Planning for retirement

Bookmark and Share

Q. I will be 62 the end of June this year. I am in FERS, would like to retire this year and am trying to make a sound decision regarding what date would be best.
1) I have 918 sick hours accumulated. Will they convert 100% into service time?
2) When trying to calculate how much I will get for retirement, is it based on basic pay or total pay with locality adjustment?
3) Is there any penalty if I retire at age 62 if I have less than 20 years of FERS service?
4) Is there any offset with Social Security? Read the rest of this entry »

Overseas direct deposit

Bookmark and Share

Q. I would like my FERS retirement monthly benefits direct deposited to my overseas account. What foreign countries does OPM allow direct deposit of retirement benefits? Is the Philippines on the list? Read the rest of this entry »

Pay for reinstatement-eligible candidate

Bookmark and Share

Q. If someone is reinstated into a federal position, is it the same step as well as grade that they were when they resigned? I have 15 years additional professional experience since I resigned from the federal government. When I resigned I was a GS-11, step 4. However my current salary with a defense contractor is in line with a GS-11 step 10 salary. If I am reinstated, am I entitled to be compensated as close to my current salary without exceeding it or at the step I was at when I resigned (GS 11 step 4). Read the rest of this entry »