Ask The Experts: Money Matters

By Mike Miles

Follow-up on TSP withdrawal

Bookmark and Share

Q. The following question/answer was recently posted. Where can I find the full information to support the answer? Are there penalties involved?

Q. I will be 55 this month and plan to retire in November with 33 years of service under CSRS. Do I have to wait until I am 59½ to withdraw from my Thrift Savings Plan?

A. Not if you wait until you’re retired to request the withdrawal.

A. Check Page 7 of this notice: https://www.tsp.gov/PDF/formspubs/tsp-536.pdf.

Tags: , , , , ,

Avoiding a penalty at age 70 1/2

Bookmark and Share

Q. I will turn 70½ after Feb. 19, and will retire from my full-time position at the end of the month. I have notified Social Security, the state retirement funds in two states where I worked, and my fund in a private approved pension fund with accounts from two other universities of my intention to retire at the end of February and to start receiving distributions in March 2014. Is there anything else that I need to do to avoid being hit with that horrid 50 percent penalty?

I received an unsavory email from the Wisconsin Employee Trust Fund scolding me for not filing at age 69½ and hinting that I would owe a 50 percent penalty for distributions not taken in 2013. I see no federal information that indicates that I needed to act at age 69½, or that I needed to begin withdrawals before age 70½. I have relied on the information posted at the Internal Revenue Service website to guide my action, but it seems to contradict the information now being sent to us prospective retirees. I hope that I have done nothing wrong to merit any penalty.

A. Your first required minimum distribution is due by April 1 of the year following the year in which you reach age 70½. Subsequent RMDs are due by the end of the calendar year. You are not required to take a distribution from an employer-sponsored retirement plan while you are still working, however.

Tags: , , , ,

Waiting to claim Social Security

Bookmark and Share

Q. I retired in July 2013 and have $500,000 in my Thrift Savings Plan. I need more money to support retirement and would like to take a lump sum of $30,000 out of TSP. I was thinking about taking the rest of the money as an allotment. Does this make sense? I have delayed my Social Security until I am 66 (I’m 64 now). My wife is taking her Social Security.

A. Waiting to claim Social Security is probably a good idea unless you have a shorter than average life expectancy and are single. If your only other source of income until you reach age 66 is your TSP account, then I think it’s reasonable to consider using it to fill the gap. If you have other resources, I encourage you to leave your TSP account for last.

Tags: , , , , , ,

TSP-to-IRA rollover

Bookmark and Share

Q. During the retirement process, how do you move the Postal Service Thrift Savings Plan account to a private, individual IRA so that there are no taxes?

A. After you’ve retired, you use Form TSP-70 to request a direct rollover to an IRA.

Tags: , , , , ,

VCP and Roth IRA conversion

Bookmark and Share

Q. I’m a CSRS employee nearing retirement. I have read numerous articles touting the advantages of opening a Voluntary Contributions Program account with up to 10 percent of your lifetime civil service earnings and then converting it to a Roth IRA at retirement. In your professional experience, would you recommend qualified individuals follow this approach? Are there potential pitfalls I’m unaware of?

A. I certainly recommend that you consider it. I don’t know of any pitfalls other than botching up the transactions and violating some rule. I suggest that you pursue it with the help of a qualified tax adviser — the one who will prepare your return for the year.

Tags: , , ,

TSP withdrawal

Bookmark and Share

Q. I will be 55 this month and plan to retire in November with 33 years of service under CSRS. Do I have to wait until I am 59½ to withdraw from my Thrift Savings Plan?

A. Not if you wait until you’re retired to request the withdrawal.

Tags: , , , ,

Starting TSP withdrawals now vs. at 70 1/2

Bookmark and Share

Q. I retired under FERS two years ago, and I haven’t needed to touch my Thrift Savings Plan account so far. I am receiving Office of Personnel Management, Social Security and military retirements. I am 68½ years old. I just received a 100 percent Veterans Affairs Department disability award, which will change my taxable military retirement to a nontaxable VA retirement. I don’t think this will have any effect on my long-term life expectancy. I have determined that I do not want to elect an annuity on withdrawing from my TSP. I am considering immediately starting a monthly TSP withdrawal based on life expectancy. What are the advantages and disadvantages of starting withdrawals immediately versus waiting until the 70½ mandatory withdrawals? I am a married man, and we declined a survivor benefit plan.

A. Starting withdrawals now will provide you with more income now but will produce a larger taxable income and begin to deplete your account. Waiting will reduce your current taxable income and preserve your account’s value (if you don’t lose it to the markets), but also reduce your current standard of living and increase your taxable income later in life.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Partial TSP withdrawal

Bookmark and Share

Q. I will be retiring in May with 25 years of federal law enforcement service. I will be 50 years old and subject to penalties and taxes on a one-time, age-based partial withdrawal from my Thrift Savings Plan. If I withdraw $20,000 to take care of bills and home repair, how much should I request from my TSP account to cover the taxes and penalties?

A. Your withdrawal will be subject to 20 percent minimum mandatory federal tax withholding, so to receive $20,000 from the TSP, you’ll need to request $25,000. The actual federal income tax, early withdrawal penalty and state tax you’ll owe for the withdrawal won’t be computed until you file your tax return for the year of the withdrawal.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

TSP withdrawal

Bookmark and Share

Q. I retired from the federal government under CSRS. I turned 70½ years old in May. I have $40,000 in my Thrift Savings Plan account. I am thinking about withdrawing all of my funds in a lump sum. Is this a good idea? How will this affect my tax obligations? What do you recommend?

A. The money you withdraw from your TSP account will be counted as ordinary income for tax purposes. If you need the money, then fine. If not, you should leave it in the TSP for as long as possible.

Tags: , , , , , ,

TSP vs. IRA

Bookmark and Share

Q. I am a federal employee, almost 30 years old and contribute to my Thrift Savings Plan, as well as a Roth IRA toward retirement. I contribute the maximum to my Roth IRA at $5,500 a year and contribute 15 percent of my $82,500 salary (approximately $12,500 a year). I have a comfortable emergency account, life insurance, $500 per month to a 529 plan for my 1-year-old, on top of the basic necessities.

How much should I be contributing if I can’t max both my TSP and Roth IRA? Should I continue with this allocation, or should I be maxing my TSP at $17,500, only putting $500 into my Roth IRA. After reviewing some items, I do not know the pros and cons to each as far as this allocation of funds.

A. I suggest that you maximize your TSP contributions before contributing to any other retirement account. The TSP is the best retirement savings and investment vehicle you’ll find. Its low cost and access to the G Fund make it so. What makes you think that your Roth IRA is a better choice?

Tags: , , , , ,